Why Incitec Pivot, Kogan, Insignia, and Resimac shares are dropping today

These shares are having a tough time on hump day. But why?

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The S&P/ASX 200 Index (ASX: XJO) is having a poor session on Wednesday. In afternoon trade, the benchmark index is down 0.4% to 7,796.7 points.

Four ASX shares that are falling more than most today are listed below. Here's why they are dropping:

Incitec Pivot Ltd (ASX: IPL)

The Incitec Pivot share price is down almost 2% to $2.85. This follows news that the agricultural chemicals company has ended negotiations with PT Pupuk Kalimantan Timur for the sale of its fertilisers business. The deal for the Incitec Pivot Fertilisers business was estimated to be valued at over $1 billion. Management advised: "Throughout the sale negotiations with PKT, we were focused on completing a sale transaction in a timely manner to allow us to commence our on-market buyback of up to $900 million. We have determined we are unlikely to achieve this outcome with PKT in an acceptable timeframe, and as a result we made the decision to cease negotiations with them."

Kogan.com Ltd (ASX: KGN)

The Kogan share price is down almost 3% to $4.02. This is despite there being no news out of the online retailer. However, it is worth noting that Kogan's shares have been under significant pressure in recent months. So much so, its shares have lost half their value since the middle of March and hit a 52-week low this morning. Investors may be concerned by rising competition from the likes of Amazon, Temu, and Shein.

Insignia Financial Ltd (ASX: IFL)

The Insignia Financial share price is down over 6% to $2.34. This financial services company's shares rose almost 14% on Tuesday in response to speculation that it could be a takeover target of a private equity firm. The media report claimed that the company, which was formerly known as IOOF, had called in Citi to support it with takeover approaches. However, after the market close yesterday, the company responded to a speeding ticket from the ASX by advising that "Citi has not been engaged to field any offers and the company is not aware of any offer."

Resimac Group Ltd (ASX: RMC)

The Resimac share price is down a further 2.5% to 79.5 cents. This non-bank lender's shares have been under pressure this week after it announced the sudden exit of its CEO without reason. According to the release, Scott McWilliam has resigned from his employment with Resimac after 21 years of service. This included six years as its CEO and three years as its joint CEO following the merger with Homeloans Limited. It also advised that Mr McWilliam will take a period of leave before his employment contract ends on 1 September 2024.

Citigroup is an advertising partner of The Ascent, a Motley Fool company. John Mackey, former CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Motley Fool contributor James Mickleboro has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool Australia's parent company Motley Fool Holdings Inc. has positions in and has recommended Amazon and Kogan.com. The Motley Fool Australia has recommended Amazon and Kogan.com. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. This article contains general investment advice only (under AFSL 400691). Authorised by Scott Phillips.

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