4 hot ASX ETFs smashing all-time highs on Thursday

ETFs are on fire this Thursday.

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At first glance, it looks as though this Thursday would be a tough one for most ASX investors. After all, the S&P/ASX 200 Index (ASX: XJO) is currently nursing a loss of 0.11%, putting the index at just over 7,650 points. But it hasn't been a universally rough day, particularly for investors of four ASX exchange-traded funds (ETFs).

Four ASX ETFs smashing all-time highs today

First up is the iShares S&P 500 ETF (ASX: IVV). It was only earlier this week that we were discussing a new record high for this US-based index fund. But today, IVV has done it again, hitting a new record of $52.06 a share.

Then we have the Vanguard US Total Market Shares Index ETF (ASX: VTS). This Thursday has seen VTS units climb up to a new record of $387.41.

The VanEck Morningstar Wide Moat ETF (ASX: MOAT) hasn't missed out either. This exchange-traded fund clocked a new high watermark of $126.99 just after market open this morning.

Then we have the BetaShares Crypto Innovators ETF (ASX: CRYP). CRYP units have continued to enjoy a huge surge that started around this time last month. Today has seen this cryptocurrency-focused ETF soar to a new record high of $5.29.

Why so many new record highs today?

You might notice that these four exchange-traded funds have something in common – they all invest in non-ASX shares. Specifically, all four of these ETFs are predominately made up of US shares.

IVV and VTS are both US-based index funds. Although they track slightly different indexes (IVV follows the S&P 500, whilst VTS tracks the CRSP U.S. Total Market Index), both funds are dominated by the likes of Apple, Microsoft, Alphabet and the other 'magnificent seven' stocks.

With the S&P 500 and the broader US market's reach continuing to clock new all-time highs in February, it's no surprise to see their ASX-listed index fund reflections do the same.

MOAT and CRYP are a little different. Both of these ETFs have more actively managed portfolios. The VanEck Wide Moat ETF holds a concentrated portfolio of companies that are selected on their perceived possession of a wide economic moat.

The Betashares Crypto Innovators ETF holds companies that are all involved in the mining and trading of cryptocurrency. Roughly 70% of these holdings are US-based. With prices of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin (CRYPTO: BTC) continuing to gallop higher alongside the US markets, it's not shocking to see this ETF follow suit.

Other ETFs clocking new highs

These four ETFs are not the only ones clocking new highs today.

We've also seen the Betashares Future Of Payments ETF (ASX: IPAY), Global X Australia ex Financials and Resources ETF (ASX: OZXX), iShares S&P 500 Mid-Cap ETF (ASX: IJH), Betashares S&P/ASX Australian Technology ETF (ASX: ATEC), iShares Europe ETF (ASX: IEU) and the BetaShares India Quality ETF (ASX: INDD) hit either new 52-week or record highs today. Amongst many others.

It's a good day to be an ETF investor.

Suzanne Frey, an executive at Alphabet, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Motley Fool contributor Sebastian Bowen has positions in Alphabet, Apple, Bitcoin, Microsoft, and VanEck Morningstar Wide Moat ETF. The Motley Fool Australia's parent company Motley Fool Holdings Inc. has positions in and has recommended Alphabet, Apple, Betashares Crypto Innovators ETF, Bitcoin, Microsoft, and iShares S&P 500 ETF. The Motley Fool Australia's parent company Motley Fool Holdings Inc. has recommended the following options: long January 2026 $395 calls on Microsoft and short January 2026 $405 calls on Microsoft. The Motley Fool Australia has recommended Alphabet, Apple, VanEck Morningstar Wide Moat ETF, and iShares S&P 500 ETF. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. This article contains general investment advice only (under AFSL 400691). Authorised by Scott Phillips.

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