The sharemarket is a great place to invest your money, provided you have a long-term mindset.

Below, I’ll prove it to you…

But first, consider this quote from Albert Einstein: “Compound interest is the eighth wonder of the world. He who understands it, earns it… he who doesn’t… pays it.”

By taking a ‘big picture’ approach to investing and being confident in your own ability to analyse and hold publicly-listed companies, the sharemarket can be a powerful tool in building up your retirement nest egg.

What’s more, Australian investors have advantages which few of our international counterparts are afforded. For example, we can invest through our self-managed superannuation funds (SMSF) for a discounted tax rate and, perhaps more importantly, we get franking credits on dividends.

That is, a discount on our personal tax returns when we report our income. Although it may not seem like it, together, these make a massive difference to what ordinary investors can achieve in the stockmarket.

But how can you double your money in just 10 years? The answer: compounding returns.

For investors to double their money in a decade, an average annual return of just 7.2% is needed.

Hypothetically, let’s take a well known example such as Telstra Corporation Ltd (ASX: TLS) so we can see just how easy it is to double an investment portfolio in 10 years.

The stock currently trades around $5.35 per share.

Since Telstra is forecast to pay a 5.4% fully franked dividend in the next 12 months, it means the share price needs to increase just 1.8% per annum to make up the difference. So, if Telstra reaches just $6.39 in the next decade (which I think it might), you would double your money – assuming it continued to pay out its current dividend for each of the next 10 years.

Let’s take another, more practical example, and assume you have $20,000 to invest today but instead of putting it all in one dividend stock and then sitting on your hands. You buy growth stocks, add $1,000 per month to your portfolio rain, hail or shine and achieve a rate of return equal to 11.8% pa – the market’s average return since 1900.

In 10 years, your portfolio will be worth $269,576.

Make a MILLION on the ASX

If you’re sitting back in awe of these numbers, remember it’s nothing new and long-term investors have been buying and holding stocks for longer than we’ve been alive. However I’m not telling you to go out and buy the first stock you see – probably Commonwealth Bank of Australia (ASX: CBA) or Woolworths Limited (ASX: WOW) – because you’re unlikely to succeed at achieving 11.8% pa with such an investment strategy.

However, by following the guidance of seasoned, likeminded long-term investors you might more than double your money in the next 10 years quite easily. For example our top investment advisor, Scott Phillips, has an excellent record of picking market-beating stocks.

Every year, we ask him to pick his #1 ASX dividend stock for new money and this year you can get the name and code of his 'ultra-promising' stock pick for FREE in our new investment report. Just click here to download your free copy of "The Motley Fool's Top Dividend Stock for 2014-2015" today.


Forget BHP and Woolworths. This "dirt cheap" company is growing like gangbusters, and trading on a 5.6% dividend yield, FULLY FRANKED (8% gross). With interest rates set to stay at these low levels for years to come, for hungry investors, including SMSFs, this ASX company could be the "holy grail" of dividend plays for 2016.

Enter your email below to discover the name, code and a full investment analysis in our brand-new FREE report, “The Motley Fool’s Top Dividend Stock for 2016.”

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Motley Fool Contributor Owen Raszkiewicz does not have a financial interest in any of the mentioned companies.