How these 4 ASX 200 bank shares have performed since reporting results

Record low interest rates didn’t hold back some hefty dividend payments from Australia’s big four banks.

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A man sprawls on the grass reaching out to touch four piggy banks, lined up in a row.

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The S&P/ASX 200 Index (ASX: XJO) banks all reported their latest batch of financial results over the last few months.

One reported full-year results last month, the others their half-year results back in May.

And when the big banks report, ASX 200 investors take note.

That’s because together the big four banks – Commonwealth Bank of Australia (ASX: CBA), Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Ltd (ASX: ANZ), Westpac Banking Corp (ASX: WBC), and National Australia Bank Ltd. (ASX: NAB) – have a combined market cap somewhere north of $446 billion.

That’s right. Almost half a trillion dollars.

With investors having now had plenty of time to digest their results, we take a look at how these 4 ASX 200 powerhouses have performed since reporting.

How has the biggest ASX 200 bank performed since reporting?

With a market cap of roughly $180 billion, CommBank is easily the biggest financial share on the ASX 200.

CBA reported its full 2021 financial year (FY21) results before market open on 11 August.

Among the key results reported was a 19.7% year-on-year increase in net profit after tax (NPAT), to $8.84 billion.

CBA’s cash earning of $8.65 billion was up 19.8% from FY20 and came in slightly above consensus analyst forecasts.

The big bank rewarded investors with a final dividend of $2 per share, fully franked. That brought the full-year dividend to $3.50 per share, an increase of 17% from the previous year.

CommBank also announced a $6 billion off-market share buyback, which was expected to cut the number of its shares by approximately 3.5%.

Investors appeared pleased with the results, sending CBA’s share price up 1.5% on the day it was reported.

Since then, shares have come under some pressure. At the time of writing the CBA share price is down 5.6% since the bank released its FY21 results. Over that same time the ASX 200 is down 2.2%.

How has NAB performed since reporting results?

Unlike CBA, National Australia Bank released its half-year results (H1 FY21) earlier in the year, on 6 May.

NAB will announce its full-year results on 9 November.

Among the core numbers, NAB’s cash earnings increased by 94.8% compared to the prior corresponding period, to $3.34 billion. Revenues were up 1%.

The bank also saw a large decline in its writeback of credit impairment charges. Those were reported as $128 million compared to a charge of $1.16 billion in the prior corresponding half year.

NAB paid out an interim dividend of 60 cents per share, fully franked, twice the interim dividend paid in the prior corresponding period.

NAB’s share price fell 3% on the day it reported these results.

Since reporting its results, the NAB share price has gained 2.5%. Over that same time the ASX 200 has gained 4.3%.

How about Westpac?

Westpac reported its half-year results on 3 May. The ASX 200 bank will announce its full-year results on 1 November.

Some of the key investor takeaways from its half-year results included a 189% year-on-year leap in statutory net profit after tax (NPAT) to $3.44 billion. Cash earnings for the half year increased 256% to $3.54 billion, compared to the prior corresponding period.

Westpac declared an interim dividend of 58 cents per share, fully franked. The bank did not pay an interim dividend in the first half of the 2020 financial year.

Investors reacted to the results by sending Westpac’s share price up 5% on the day.

Since releasing its results, the Westpac share price is up 2.6% at time of writing. The ASX 200 is up 5.4% over that same time.

And lastly…

How has ASX 200-listed ANZ performed since reporting results?

Australia and New Zealand Banking Group reported its half-year results before market open on 5 May.

Core results included a 45% increase in statutory profit after tax from the prior corresponding half year to $2.94 billion.

Cash earnings from continuing operations increased 28% compared to the second half of FY20, hitting $2.99 billion. ANZ reported a return on equity (ROE) of 9.7%.

The bank paid out an interim dividend of 70 cents per share, fully franked.

Despite beating consensus analyst expectations, the ANZ share price closed down 3.2% on the day it reported.

Since reporting, ANZ’s share price is down 4.2%. By comparison the ASX 200 is up 4.7% over the same period.

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The Motley Fool Australia’s parent company Motley Fool Holdings Inc. has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool Australia has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. This article contains general investment advice only (under AFSL 400691). Authorised by Bruce Jackson.

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