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Australian Agricultural Company Ltd (ASX: AAC) Share Price and News

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Australian Agricultural Company Ltd (ASX: AAC) was established in 1824 and claims the honour of being Australia’s oldest continuously operating company. The company is the largest integrated cattle producer in Australia, providing beef for both domestic and export markets.

Australian Agricultural Company owns around 6.4 million hectares of land across Queensland the Northern Territory comprised of farms, feedlots and processing plants. Its land ownership amounts to around 1% of Australia’s entire land mass.

Specialising in grass fed and Wagyu beef, some of the company’s brands include Wylarah, Westholme Wagyu, Master Kobe and Darling Downs Wagyu.

Originally listing on the ASX in 2001, the Australian Agricultural Company share price trended upwards for around seven years after listing. Since early 2008, however, the Australian Agricultural Company share price has been largely flat other than some periodic upticks, particularly during 2016 and 2017.

Australian Agricultural Company Ltd (ASX: AAC) Latest News

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