The S&P/ASX 300 (Index: ^AXKO) (ASX: XKO) has taken off following the RBA’s decision to cut the official cash rate by 0.25% today and heading into the close is up more than 2%.

Australia’s big four banks have all surged higher and are leading the market higher while resources shares are lagging.

Going against the trend, these four smaller companies all saw their share prices sink…

1-Page Ltd (ASX: 1PG) saw its share price crash 16% to 73 cents, and the share price has now lost 78% of its value since the start of this year. The once-promising market darling saw its share price sink 7% yesterday after its annual report had materially different earnings from its preliminary results and investors clearly aren’t happy. The company is trying to disrupt the hiring process and make it easier and cheaper for companies to filter job applicants but has yet to make a profit.

SMS Management & Technology Limited (ASX: SMX) saw its share fall 15% to $1.565, after the technology consulting firm announced a massive profit downgrade and the resignation of its CEO. As we wrote earlier today, this is a tough sector and there are very small margins for errors thanks to its high fixed cost base and low profit margins. Like companies operating in the mining services sector, IT consultants can see their business dry up through no fault of their own if their customers feel the need to cut costs.

PS&C Ltd (ASX: PSZ) has seen its share price fall 7.9% to 70 cents, despite no news from the company. PS&C is an IT company providing contracting and recruitment, security, and unified communications systems and solutions to a wide variety of customers, but recent financial results weren’t exactly thrilling as we pointed out in February. Director Leanne O’Connor has also been selling down her holding – which now stands at 9.14% after selling 1.7 million shares in the past two months.

Lynas Corporation Limited (ASX: LYC) continues to fall, losing another 4.5% to 6.4 cents, as investors fret over the long-term viability of the rare earths producer. Last week Lynas reported that it was unable to maintain its breakeven performance in the March quarter, which is stopping the company from paying down debts and reinvesting back into the business to improve its performance. Stuck between a rock and a hard place, Lynas is only still in business thanks to the flexibility of its lenders.

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Motley Fool writer/analyst Mike King doesn't own shares in any companies mentioned. You can follow Mike on Twitter @TMFKinga

The Motley Fool Australia has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. This article contains general investment advice only (under AFSL 400691). Authorised by Bruce Jackson.